The last United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) is now underway and member states are making new commitments to avert a climate catastrophe.

More than 100 countries have pledged to end deforestation by 2030 in an attempt to sequester carbon emissions, and more have started pledging to emit net zero emissions.

READ MORE: The Magical Luna Drive-In Theater Experience Comes To Brands Hatch This Christmas

The Leaders’ Summit was held on November 1-2, where every world leader made a commitment on how they would save the planet.



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Prime Minister Boris Johnson has made it clear how we need to make changes if we are to have a habitable planet for our future generations.

He described the situation saying it was “one minute before midnight on this doomsday clock and we must act now”.

If world leaders fail to make dramatic changes and if pollution continues at current levels, many parts of Kent are threatened by climate change.

Climate Central, a nonprofit news organization focused on climate science, has released sea level projections showing how locally threatened we are here in Kent.

According to the organization, large parts of the county are expected to regularly fall below the annual flood level by 2030.

Defining the annual flood level, Climate Central said: “Annual flood level is used to refer to the water level on the shore that local coastal flooding exceeds on average once a year.

“In other words, ten floods are statistically expected to exceed this level over ten years, although some years may have two or more incidents and others none.”

It should be noted that these images are based on predictions if we do not make emission reductions.

Kent regions expected to be underwater by 2030

Dover



Dover's seafront is under threat
Dover’s seafront is under threat

Large parts of Dover’s waterfront are expected to be underwater, including the port and the old cruise terminal.

The city center could even be threatened by 2050.

OK



Deal seafront under threat from Ramsgate to Kingsdown
Deal seafront under threat from Ramsgate to Kingsdown

Large parts of Deal will also be submerged, including Betteshanger Park.

The seafront stretching from Kingsdown to Ramsgate could disappear.

Sandwich



Large parts of Sandwiches are in danger
Large parts of Sandwiches are in danger

The Royal St George Golf Club and a huge radius surrounding it in Sandwich will be underwater, according to these predictions.

Canterbury



Low areas near Canterbury are at risk
Low areas near Canterbury are at risk

Pretty low-level villages around Canterbury could also be underwater, including Wingham, Wickhambreax, Stodmarsh and Fordwich.

Thanet



Thanet could become an island again
Thanet could become an island again

While the majority of Thanet is expected to remain rather dry, the island itself could turn back into an island.

Climate change could cause the Wantsum Canal to return, again separating Thanet from mainland Britain.

The seafronts of Margate, Ramsgate, Botany Bay and Pegwell Bay will also face flooding.

Herne Bay



Parts of Herne Bay could be submerged
Parts of Herne Bay could be submerged

Herne Bay, Swalecliffe, Hampton and parts of Thanet Way could be submerged.

Whitstable



Whitstable could soon be underwater
Whitstable could soon be underwater

Whitstable, Seasalter, and Graveney all appear ready to be underwater when The Swale rises.

Faversham



The rise of the Swale puts inland areas even more at risk
The rise of the Swale puts inland areas even more at risk

In fact, The Swale looks set to go up so much that it will cover a huge portion of the coastline – stretching all the way to Faversham.

Folkestone



Folkestone seafront is under threat
Folkestone seafront is under threat

The rocky heights of the Leas will apparently protect most of Folkestone, but the waterfront is about to submerge.

Romney Marais



Romney Marsh's majority could be in danger
Romney Marsh’s majority could be in danger

Most of Romney Swamp will disappear, stretching from Hythe to Camber and all the way to Woodchurch.

Sittingbourne



Sittingbourne is in grave danger
Sittingbourne is in grave danger

Large parts of Sittingbourne which extend as far as Iwade are said to be underwater.

Dartford



Dartford runs the risk of being overwhelmed
Dartford runs the risk of being overwhelmed

Huge parts of Dartford could be submerged if emissions were to maintain their current levels.

Swanscombe



The rise of the Thames would endanger Swanscombe
The rise of the Thames would endanger Swanscombe

It is not only the rise in sea level that is in question.

The Thames would rise and submerge much of Swanscombe.

Aylesford



Aylesford would be threatened by the River Medway
Aylesford would be threatened by the River Medway

The River Medway could become much wider, taking with it most of Aylesford, Forstal and Larkfield.

Holborough



Holborough is also threatened by the River Medway
Holborough is also threatened by the River Medway

The growing River Medway could also take Holborough, Ham Hill and the surrounding areas.

Medway



Rochester and Gillingham are in danger
Rochester and Gillingham are in danger

The Medway City Estate could be lost in the river due to climate change.

It would also put much of Rochester and Gillingham at risk.

Hoo Peninsula



The coasts of the Hoo Peninsula are in great danger
The coasts of the Hoo Peninsula are in great danger

Much of the Hoo Peninsula would be underwater if emissions were to remain unchanged, especially the east and west coasts.

Isle of Sheppey



Most of Sheppey would be in danger
Most of Sheppey would be in danger

About three-quarters of the Isle of Sheppey would also disappear due to rising sea levels.

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